Advantages of studying in the US for the EASA PPL holder

At the first glance it does not look very natural to go study to the US if the final goal is the EASA CPL, but I’ve chosen this way on purpose.

First of all, my final goal is not only EASA license but both EASA and FAA. That is because I consider job opportunities all over the world, and in some places FAA license can be more valuable. But even for Europe it makes sense to consider studying in the US:

  • the flight hour is way less expensive – in 2018 I got Cessna 150 for $100 per hour;
  • the flight experience is much more interesting – usually there is more traffic, mush more various airports (both controlled and uncontrolled), more complicated airspace. Additionally, usually there are no landing fees almost everywhere;
  • ATC speaks English. They talk really fast and provide a lot of information, and if you struggle with communications, it’s a great way to learn. Moreover, the ATC is really great almost everywhere;
  • it’s always fun to travel somewhere. I believe that it’s a great advantage for a (future) pilot. And flight experience in a different country could be a great vacation time.

Cost-wise I believe that my way was even less expensive than the “standard” EASA PPL, night, IR and CPL.

I still consider my US experience as the most valuable one during the entire training towards CPL, but, of course, there are some drawback too:

  • a student visa is required;
  • TSA flight training approval is required for Instrument Rating and Multi-Engine Rating;
  • living expenses are a little higher;
  • you should travel and live far from home.

I consider that the drawbacks are negligible compared to advantages. For some more details about the differences between Europe and the US please the post.

Fly safe!


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Milestones

04/09/2017: My First Flight
04/25/2017: EASA PPL written exam (6 exams passed)
05/21/2017: Radio Operator Certificate (Europe VFR)
05/22/2017: EASA PPL written exam (all passed)
05/26/2017: The First Solo!
05/28/2017: Solo cross-country >270 km
05/31/2017: EASA PPL check-ride
07/22/2017: EASA IFR English
08/03/2017: 100 hours TT
12/04/2017: The first IFR flight
12/28/2017: FAA IR written
02/16/2018: FAA IR check-ride
05/28/2018: FAA Tailwheel endorsement
06/04/2018: FAA CPL long cross-country
06/07/2018: FAA CPL written
07/16/2018: FAA CPL check-ride
07/28/2018: FAA CPL ME rating
08/03/2018: FAA HP endorsement
06/03/2019: EASA ATPL theory (6/14)
07/03/2019: EASA ATPL theory (11/14)
07/15/2019: FAA IR IPC
07/18/2019: FAA CPL SES rating
08/07/2019: EASA ATPL theory (done)
10/10/2019: EASA NVFR
10/13/2019: EASA IR/PBN SE
11/19/2019: Solo XC > 540 km
12/06/2019: EASA CPL
12/10/2019: EASA AMEL
02/20/2020: Cessna 210 endorsement
08/30/2021: FAVT validation
05/27/2022: TCCA CPL/IR written
05/31/2022: Radio Operator Certificate Canada