AviationExam discount: How to Save 50$

In my previous posts I already mentioned AviationExam, the great question bank for EASA exams. It is surprisingly good for FAA exams too: in spite of the fact that almost nobody in the US heard about it, from my opinion it is the best tool after Sheppard Air. I passed my FAA IR and FAA CPL written with it, and I suppose it is comparable to Gleim, probably even better, and monthly plans are available.

The usual annual subscription price for all EASA subjects is about 170 euros. The competitors (BGS Online and AtplQuestions) charge almost the same amount. Spoiler: there is a way to get a discount.

I already mentioned a discount in case of purchasing 5+ copies. It did not work for me: my blog is not so popular, and I did not want to specifically look for people interested in that product. Therefore, I have been already ready to buy it: yesterday my BGS Online subscription expired.

Unfortunately I’ve never heard about AviationExam discount codes except for black friday or cyber monday, but I already missed those promotions, so it was not the case too.

Today I was looking for free FAA books in AviationExam application for iPad (they are really great, and they are available in the application for download). Occasionally I checked EASA yearly subscription, and it was 150$! Was it magic? I don’t know, but for some reason the subscription is cheaper from iOS app than from the website. The subscription bought from iPad remains valid for all devices, so I can study from my PC or Android app too. The price is permanent, so I didn’t have to wait for black friday to save about 50$ by this small trick 🙂

AviationExam and BGS Online

My EASA ATPL written test preparation moves on very slowly. But I don care, because during this time I completed my FAA IR, and now I am working on my FAA CPL. Nevertheless, I am still interested in EASA ATPL, and I’d like to continue studying.

So, my yearly BGS Online subscription is close to ending, and I’d like to either renew it or purchase AviationExam product. Possibly anybody is interested in the EASA QB access? Group price is cheaper, and purchasing 5-10 subscriptions can save some $$$ =)

Question Bank for the FAA CPL written

I am in doubt: I feel that generally I am ready for the FAA CPL written test. I went through the official FAA materials, but I’d like to use some question bank for the evaluation.

With EASA subjects it is pretty easy: there are only 2 providers (bgsonline and aviationexam), and both are really cool.

So, after some research I found these services:

  • sheppard air. It seems that it is a leader in terms of materials quality, but they don’t have an online version, and they are kinda expensive.
  • ASA. Users’ feedback is pretty good, slightly worse than sheppard but still acceptable. They have android version, online version, offline version… Possibly it can be a better option.
  • Dauntless. I found some mentions, but nothing more. They don’t look alive.
  • Gleim. It was great for my IR, but not sure about the CPL materials.
  • Aviationexam. Their interface is great and works on any teapot, their EASA materials are astonishing. But I am not sure that they are OK for FAA tests, not so many questions exist in their database.

Possibly somebody has any experience with these providers? Does it make sense to buy Sheppard Air? They seem like state-of-the-art.

Principles of Flight

When you have a goal, it’s better to make even a small step towards that goal regularly, ideally every day.

As you probably know, I am going to be a pilot. Currently I don’t have a possibility to fly due to my job, but I am using my free time to study the EASA ATPL subjects.

Currently I am working on Principles of Flight. This subject requires some thinking, but mainly it requires memorizing. I am not so good with that kind of subjects, so I decided to study them before those which require mainly calculations.

My personal top-3 of the most difficult subjects is the following: air law, operational procedures, meteorology; but ‘principles of flight’ just follows them.

I use question banks for evaluation, and when I start a new subject, my result is around 60-70%. I am reading the books, then I am taking tests, and then I am reviewing all wrong answers using the books, and soon enough the result becomes 90% and more.

I am moving much slower that I planned: initially I supposed to take exams this summer. Currently I am pretty good only in four subjects of fourteen. Actually it is not so bad considering the fact that some subjects are relatively easy (for example, VFR/IFR Communications), but it’s still way behind the initial schedule.

On the other hand, I am still working full-time, I have a valid FAA IR with the US flight experience and 150 hours total time, and I am ready for the FAA CPL written test.

It is still difficult to make progress. I heard that the EASA ATPL theory is the most difficult part of the EASA Commercial path, and I tend to agree with that. But my motivation is strong, and I was always good in studying, especially if I am interested in the subject. It’s moving slowly, but it’s still moving anyway, and it’s worth it. The reward will be one of the most exciting things in my life.

FAA IR(A) Written Test

What to do in a bad weather? Of course, the best choice is studying! I felt pretty confident about my knowledge, so I decided to take a written test. The exam itself is not so hard. The program interface looks exactly like gleim’s software, the pictures are the same as the ones available in all popular question banks (for example, gleim, jeppesen, sportys, aviationexam).

The questions are not exactly the same as in preparation books, but nothing special. Take your time, read the question very carefully, don’t hurry up, and you’re done. The point is knowledge.

One more advice for those who prepares for the FAA IR tests: apart from reading the books (which is essential), use question banks to get the idea about your knowledge. I heard a lot about Sheppard, but less expensive alternatives work too. For example, I used gleim and aviationexam (both are good, the latter also offer monthly subscriptions – very convenient if you want only refresh your knowledge) and got 87%. Not an astonishing result, but not bad too.

FAA Instrument Rating

Long time passed since my previous post, but that’s only because almost nothing was happening. I am studying a lot, it’s really hard to remember all this stuff. I didn’t have much free time, but when I did, I was looking for the best American flight school.

Finally I found the option which satisfied me enough, and I’m in progress of getting I-20 for M1 visa. I decided to obtain an Instrument Rating in the US.

I’m not going to stay in the US for a log time since I still have a job in Russia, but I’d like to obtain a Commercial License there. I am almost sure that I will have to come more than once for that, so I am talking about Instrument Rating only for now.

Since I cannot speed up the visa process, I am studying and gaining money for my training. I am going to get my EASA license as well regardless of the FAA one.

ATPL Theory

Finally I found a school where I am going to study my theory. The school is in Poland (I already described some thoughts why I choose that country). The problem is that I have to obtain a permission (something like a TSA approval in the US), and I have to send my application in paper form, which takes some time. I sent my papers, and now I am waiting for an answer.

My meteorology results are not so bad, and I am switching to the Human Performance.

I also applied for the FAA validation of my EASA PPL to the FSDO in Miami since I am still considering that option.

IFR English

Today I passed my practical IFR English exam. In Europe it is a requirement for Instrument Rating. I don’t plan to get European IR now, but my English is pretty good, so why not? It was nothing special even in spite of the fact that I don’t have any IR experience except one flight as a backseat passenger in Cessna C172. Of course I don’t consider my flights as an airline passenger because I don’t hear any communications 🙂

In the first (written) part I had to define some terms like “straight-in approach”, “jet stream” or “alternate current”. I did not find any unfamiliar terms, and it was harder to express it than understand. After that I had to unfold some abbreviations.

In the second (oral) part I described approach plates (RNAV and ILS) and answered some questions about them, and finally there was a simulated communication with ATC.

Everything was OK, and now I have one more important document 🙂

Meteorology

After some studying I am not so bad in Aircraft General Knowledge. My result is still not perfect, but I have more than 80%. I am going to continue, but now it’s time to start a new subject. I chose Meteorology as the most difficult one for me as it mostly requires knowledge compared to, for example, Navigation, where I can solve lots of questions by computation.

Meteorology looks like a nightmare for me now as it contains lots of information and bunch of new terms. I had to refresh my knowledge in Geography as well. Nevertheless, it is very interesting, and I am happy that I can understand what happens in our atmosphere much better. Now it is not just beautiful clouds there but logical physical processes. Some years ago I learned some of that information in my hanggliding course, but we did not consider high altitudes then.

I am going to dedicate about 2 weeks per subject. Some subjects will require a longer (for example, Air Law or Meteorology), and others will need a shorter time (for example, Communications). I suppose that I have to maintain my streak for getting closer to my goal. Some years ago I passed Quantum Mechanics exam (my personal nightmare in the institute), so I hope that I have no fear after that 🙂