Mastering the Art of Tailwheel Landings

I am continuing my tailwheel training.

I’ve discovered that taxiing in the Citabria is not as challenging as it initially seemed, but it still demands smooth, gentle and precise manipulation of the pedals.

There are two distinct landing methods: the first involves maintaining a nose-high attitude, allowing the tailwheel to touch down first, and then applying additional pull force to slow down until the main wheels also make contact with the ground. The second method requires keeping the airplane’s nose relatively low, gently and precisely letting the main wheels touch the ground while keeping the tailwheel in the air.

The second approach is considerably more challenging, necessitating an extremely low vertical speed at the moment of touchdown. Furthermore, it’s a bit counterintuitive — you have to push the stick when the wheels are on the ground, contrary to reflexes that might urge you to do the opposite.

Flying and landing a tailwheel airplane is genuinely fascinating. It enhances visual flying skills, especially directional control and landings. If you’re a pilot or contemplating becoming one, I strongly recommend having this experience.


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Milestones

04/09/2017: My First Flight
04/25/2017: EASA PPL written exam (6 exams passed)
05/21/2017: Radio Operator Certificate (Europe VFR)
05/22/2017: EASA PPL written exam (all passed)
05/26/2017: The First Solo!
05/28/2017: Solo cross-country >270 km
05/31/2017: EASA PPL check-ride
07/22/2017: EASA IFR English
08/03/2017: 100 hours TT
12/04/2017: The first IFR flight
12/28/2017: FAA IR written
02/16/2018: FAA IR check-ride
05/28/2018: FAA Tailwheel endorsement
06/04/2018: FAA CPL long cross-country
06/07/2018: FAA CPL written
07/16/2018: FAA CPL check-ride
07/28/2018: FAA CPL ME rating
08/03/2018: FAA HP endorsement
06/03/2019: EASA ATPL theory (6/14)
07/03/2019: EASA ATPL theory (11/14)
07/15/2019: FAA IR IPC
07/18/2019: FAA CPL SES rating
08/07/2019: EASA ATPL theory (done)
10/10/2019: EASA NVFR
10/13/2019: EASA IR/PBN SE
11/19/2019: Solo XC > 540 km
12/06/2019: EASA CPL
12/10/2019: EASA AMEL
02/20/2020: Cessna 210 endorsement
08/30/2021: FAVT validation
05/27/2022: TCCA CPL/IR written
05/31/2022: Radio Operator Certificate Canada