Free Flight

The blog is still alive, as like the idea 🙂

Last week I traveled to Prague. It was not related to my aviation progress, but I did not want to miss this opportunity, and tried to find an airplane. Unfortunately I had a very tight schedule, and it did not happen.

I had a day in Warsaw though, thus I signed up for ATPL theory course there. It is a distant learning with just 2 weeks on site. I signed the papers, and now I am waiting for Polish CAA approval.

At the aerodrome I realized that I still have some time, and there are some planes 🙂 I tried to hire a plane, but did not succeed. Neither Ventum Air nor Salt Aviation could help me with that. When I had almost lost my hope I spotted a small building with the label “Runway Pilot School”. I entered there and asked for a plane, and voila! They provided both an airplane and a safety pilot in some minutes!

I got Cessna 172, but it was fuel injection modification with 180hp engine. It has fuel pumps, and does not have carb heater. It climbs faster than I used to in C172, and it flies nicely 🙂

One more flight hour, and my first flight in Poland!

Night flight

During my previous visit here I completed almost all commercial requirements related to night hours except one 2-hour cross-country. I wanted to fly it, but some circumstances prevented that flight.

This time it seems to be as planned. I checked the airplane in advance, ensured that we have full tanks and enough oil. Ensured that nobody will fly the airplane since that check.

The airplane is just from maintenance. We fly with my instructor.

So, here we go. Checking everything one more time, reading checklists. Everything is OK. Taxiing to the runway. Accelerating. Airspeed raises, but extremely slow. It is more than 500 ft, but we still have 45. 45, 47… The runway is long, but not endless. Aborting take-off… We are OK and stopped well before runway threshold, but I think that the real speed was more than 70 when decision was made.

Some system malfunction is not a pleasant case. I was slightly scared. And I have to react quickly.

Taxiing back, shutdown. But I still want to fly! The weather is good. Another airplane is OK, fuel is OK, oil is OK. We still can fly!

The flight was good. I thought that it’s hard to see clouds at night, but actually it is not. We can fly well below them.

We flew to KVNC, and requested flight following. For the some reason the controller diverted us along the shoreline, around class B airspace.

Return flight is also around class B airspace, but on the East side. Firstly because of weather avoidance, and secondly because it’s fun to fly a different route.

I like night flying 🙂

Jacksonville

One more cross-country flight to jacksonville Executive. Our route crosses a restricted area: when it is active, I cannot fly there in specified altitude range. That area can be activated in specified hours, or by NOTAM. If it is active, I should avoid it or choose an altitude out of the area range.

Briefing. The area is inactive. The weather is good. Let’s fly!

It is the first flight when I asked for flight following: ATC sees me on the radar and potentially warns about close traffic and bad weather. It is very similar to IFR flight, but now I can look around =)

At about 10 miles before entering restricted area I ask the controller about area status, just in case. Everything is OK. And the controller gives me some more information about adjacent areas.

Flight following is a very useful thing. I like it. Especially because I don’t have neither TCAS nor ADS-B equipment, and traffic information can be useful in busy areas.

I also plan some flights with IFR flight plan in a good weather to maintain my communication skills and shoot some approaches. I have to be proficient in it before entering real IMC.

To be continued

This post is becoming traditional when I continue my practical training after 1-3 months interruption: blog is still alive, the idea is alive too.

At least I am piloting again. I flew more than an hour today. Normal take-offs and landing, short field take-offs and landings, soft field take-offs and landings. Stalls, steep turns. I missed it a lot!

I continue my training. I already wrote that I am going part 61 instead of 141 for my CPL, and it is really perfect. Yes, it is 250h TT vs 190, but I highly doubt that I can find any job with < 200h TT. And I already have 150h after my EASA/FAA PPL + FAA IR, because I flew more than 50 solo cross-country hours in August for meeting my EASA CPL requirements in future.

So, it’s really great, because I can go faster. The instructor is unavailable, but the weather is good? OK, fly solo. The weather is bad for cross-country? OK, practice commercial maneuvers in the vicinity of the aerodrome. Bad weather? Fly IFR. For part 141 it is not recommended: you should follow a syllabus.

Besides, I am preparing to FAA written. Now I use aviationexam and gleim with more than 90% score. Possibly will purchase sheppard, but not sure for now.

Finally I ordered an iPad. I’m not a fan, but I’d like to use foreflight, and it exists only for iOS. I understand that there are plenty of alternatives, but what is the point? Foreflight is really great. Everybody knows it, and almost everybody uses it.

I am also thinking about portable ADS-B receiver for better situational awareness. Or I can just wait until 2020 requirement will enter into force =)

IR part 141: Holding

The next part of the course includes flying holding patterns.

Sometimes it is not possible to make the next planned step or maneuver right away: for example, due to very congested air traffic, or rapidly changing weather. In this case an aircraft can wait some time in the air. But the airplane is constantly moving through the air to stay airborne, it cannot just stop. That is what holding procedures about: how to properly wait for the next phase of flight.

The holding pattern itself does not differ a lot from the aerodrome pattern, but both the wind speed and the airplane speed is usually higher. On the other hand, there is no climb or descend during the hold.

This part of training is mainly about how to enter the pattern, and about keeping the flight parameters (altitude, speed, course) as close to the chosen values as possible.

Stage Check

Part 141 IR course requires a proficiency check after every stage of training. Totally there are 3 stage checks and a final end-of-course check. The part 141 course also requires the strict defined lessons order, so one cannot start next stages before the previous stage check.

I have been waiting for the first stage check for three days due to the examiner availability and the weather, and finally flew it today.

Actually it should not be scary: it is not a checkride, and the instructor should not sign the student off for it if the latter is not ready. But it is a little disturbing anyway.

The student should perform the following maneuvers: steep turns, stalls, standard rate turns, climb and descend with a defined rate, unusual attitude recovery. And, of course, takeoff and landing. We also made one GPS approach as a bonus, the first one in my life.

Our chief pilot (he was my stage check examiner today) is a former fighter pilot. It’s a pleasure to fly unusual attitude recovery with him! I will definitely ask him about spin recovery training some day 🙂

We made only one hour which seemed for me to be at least two. And now I can move on!

IR Part 141: Lessons 9 and 10

It’s vital for an instrument pilot to be proficient with the airplane navigation equipment. We’re continuing with VOR and starting with GPS. We have garmin 430 in all airplanes, and its interface is not very complicated. However the main problem is multitasking: it’s not so easy to properly fly the airplane and simultaneously tune frequencies while taking with ATC.

Today we were flying 08H. It’s a great airplane with some more powerful engine than our other cessnas. Some students don’t like her flaps switch (hold, 1-2-3, release), but for me that is even more straightforward than the ‘usual’ one.

The weather today promised cloud ceiling at 6200 feet and scattered clouds at 3000 feet. Anyway I was still flying ‘under the hood’ and was not able to see anything except the instruments, and the instruments don’t show clouds. I’m already missing visual flying 🙂

I like my progress. With more experience it turns out that we enough have time to tune frequencies, push buttons and even listen to the ATIS (weather and aerodrome information). The journey is going on!

IR Part 141: lessons 7 and 8

Lesson 7 is just a brush-up of all previous lessons: mostly airplane control and unusual attitudes.

Lesson 8 is completely new though, and it is all about navigation. It contains mainly VOR interception and tracking. The theory is easy, but on practice the workload was pretty high at the first time since I had to use maps, mentally calculate some parameters, and tune required frequencies while keeping the airplane control in the allowed limits.

I’ve already had the very similar feeling at least twice during my PPL training. The first one was about starting to communicate in the aerodrome traffic pattern, and the second one was about the very first flying in CTR (controlled airspace around the aerodrome).

On the ground everything looks very straightforward, but in the air even not so many additional tasks add significant workload, since the airplane control skills are still not very strong and also take a lot of mental resources.

Actually instrument flying can be easier than visual to some extent: one village does not differ very much from another but radio aid frequency does, and it’s harder to get lost while flying by instruments. However in Florida even visual flying is not so hard since there are a lot of highways and roads running from Notrh to South and from West to East.

Today I wrote stage II check and got 85%. I am not happy with the result, and I carefully reviewed my mistakes. BTW, I have a very tricky question 🙂 Probably you know that usually SARL is less then DARL. But why is the warm and moist atmosphere is more unstable compared to the dry one?

IR Part 141: Lesson 6

Today’s weather is pretty challenging: occasional wind gusts up to 15 knots. Apart from that everything is great, and we’re going to fly at about 3000 feet where it is not so turbulent.

Today I flew another airplane, and I had an impression that is it not properly trimmed and tends to turn left. But the compass in it was more stable. The pilot’s seat was not perfectly comfortable, I felt that I needed a pillow even though I am not a very short guy (5’10”).

The previous lessons were all about controlling the airplane without any outside references. Today we started to use navigation instruments: VOR, NDB, GPS. We don’t have DME in any of the airplanes.

Apart from the navigation, we were continuing to practice maneuvers: constant rate climb and descend, constant rate turns, constant speed climb/descend, partial panel flying and compass turns without the gyro.

Wind gusts were becoming stronger, so we made only one flight today.

Today I passed the stage II written test, which mainly consisted of approach charts questions. It was exhausting: not so hard, but it required attention. My result was 90%. I know that I could do better, but I am still satisfied.

I suppose that I should take the rest of written tests ASAP and concentrate on the practical part.

Systems Failure

For every pilot it’s very important do deal with any system failure. Prompt failure recognition and corrective action can become vital, especially in a bad weather.

Today’s lesson was about flying without some instruments (it’s called ‘partial panel’). In practice it means that the instructors covered some instruments, and I had to perform the usual maneuvers: stalls, steep turns, turns to a given heading, climbing/descending to a given altitude, recovery from unusual attitudes.

The weather today was really great. It was a little bit turbulent below 2000 ft, but calm and nice above. Flying in those conditions was much easier that yesterday. BTW today night the temperature was even below zero in sunny Florida 🙂 Daytime weather is warm enough, I usually wear T-shirt. Locals do not share my opinion though.

Cessna 172 requires higher forces on the yoke for nice landing, much higher than cessna 150. Steep turns also require higher control input. It’s much better to do it consciously now – today my piloting was smoother. The basic landing principle is the same though: pull and wait, pull and wait… I love flying that airplane.

Today I also passed the first stage check and scored 88%. I am not very happy with that result, but that’s above the pass mark anyway. Tomorrow I’m going to pass the second stage check, I suppose that I am ready and it does not make sense to postpone it.